Custer Battlefield at Little Big Horn is something you have to see in person.  The vistas are breathtaking.  It's interesting to imagine what happened here that fateful day.
This is the view as you enter Custer Battlefield..

 

There are currently 4400 soldiers representing all wars buried here.  There are also many American Indians buried here.

Here is a memorial honoring those soldiers that cleared the area of hostile Indians.

Here is a view of Custer's Last Stand as you walk by the cemetery and museum.

Here is a better view of Custer's Last Stand, looking down the hill toward the cemetery and museum.

Custer's marker is painted black.

These markers represent where the soldiers fell.  They were originally buried here, but later moved to their final resting spots a day or two after the battle.

Most of the soldiers are buried in a mass grave under the monument stone to the right in the picture.  Custer's body and those of the officers were later moved to other final resting spots.

Here is the marker that commemorates the battle that took place on June 25 and 26 of 1876.

Under this marker is the mass grave for most of the soldiers that lost their lives in this battle.

Here is a marker commemorating the second battle just a couple miles away from Little Big Horn.

These units were almost wiped out as reinforcements arrived.

Markers can be seen all over both battlefields and in between that mark the spots soldiers fell.  This marker was interesting in that the date of death was not clearly known.

From this view point, you would have seen Indians coming if you were on Custer's horse.

The plains are wide open.  The only trees are near riverbeds.  The shrubbery is only a foot high.

If you see trees out here, there is an excellent chance you will find water.  Most of the land had limited vegetation away from water.  I can imagine it would be easy to ride a horse in this type of terrain.

The scenery is beautiful, but the climate is very warm.  Fighting in a battle in Summer with Uniforms on must have been rough.

This page was last enhanced on Saturday, January 03, 2004